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Phyllosilicates near Syrtis Major
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Phyllosilicates near Syrtis Major

Acquired Date: July 1, 2010
Release Date: March 14, 2015
Latitude: 17.57 N
Longitude: 76.62 E
Keywords: Crater Interior/Rim/Ejecta, Landing Site, Hydrated Mineral, Mafic minerals, Phyllosilicate minerals, Dichotomy Boundary
Parameters: BD2290 (Mg/Fe-OH minerals), D2300 (Fe-Mg phyllosilicates), OLINDEX3 (Olivine)

This image shows a site near Syrtis Major, an expansive volcanic structure. This CRISM image displays olivine-rich rocks in red and rocks rich in iron/magnesium-containing clay-like minerals called phyllosilicates in various other colors. Olivine is present in most places on Mars and reflects the volcanic nature of most crustal materials. Phyllosilicates, in contrast, show where water was present at least at one point in time.



This image shows a site near Syrtis Major, an expansive volcanic structure. This CRISM image displays olivine-rich rocks in red and rocks rich in iron/magnesium-containing clay-like minerals called phyllosilicates in various other colors. Olivine is present in most places on Mars and reflects the volcanic nature of most crustal materials. Phyllosilicates, in contrast, show where water was present at least at one point in time.

The geology around the northeastern Syrtis Major region is dominated by the Isidis impact basin just to the east, visible in the global view as a light blue circle. Olivine-rich rocks occur this area and may be either volcanic lava or olivine-rich impact melt that was splashed into this location during the formation of Isidis. Syrtis Major is a shield volcano, although is very different from other shield volcanoes on Mars. Unlike other Martian volcanoes (like the Tharsis Montes volcanoes), Syrtis Major has a very low aspect ratio meaning that its height is squished in comparison to its width.

Link to further description of the spectral parameters shown in this image can be found here.

Disclaimer: Colors shown here represent indicators of mineralogy and are not what the human eye would see.

Acknowledgements: THEMIS, CRISM, Google Earth, MOLA.

The Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) is one of six science instruments on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Led by The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, the CRISM team includes expertise from universities, government agencies and small businesses in the United States and abroad.

CRISM's mission: Find the spectral fingerprints of aqueous and hydrothermal deposits and map the geology, composition and stratigraphy of surface features. The instrument also tracks seasonal variations in dust and ice aerosols in the Martian atmosphere, and water content in surface materials — leading to new understanding of the climate.

Credit: NASA/JPL/JHUAPL

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