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CRISM (Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars)
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Extensional Features From the Horizon
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Extensional Features From the Horizon

Acquired Date: February 10, 2010
Release Date: September 12, 2014
Latitude: -51.00 N
Longitude: 262.00 E
Keywords: Atmospheric, Space, Tharsis Region
Parameters: N/A

The image shows a limb (meaning a view of the horizon) of the planet where the surface can be seen at the bottom, the atmosphere in the middle, and space is above in black. In order to make these observations, the MRO spacecraft must pitch onto its side so CRISM no longer looks down at the surface, but instead out onto the horizon of the planet. This particular observation shows the hazy atmosphere over the Thaumasia Fossae, which are extensional features south of the Tharsis region. They can been seen very clearly in the bottom of this image, superposed by younger craters. For scale, the largest crater in this image is ~20 km (~14 miles) across.



The image shows a limb (meaning a view of the horizon) of the planet where the surface can be seen at the bottom, the atmosphere in the middle, and space is above in black. In order to make these observations, the MRO spacecraft must pitch onto its side so CRISM no longer looks down at the surface, but instead out onto the horizon of the planet. This particular observation shows the hazy atmosphere over the Thaumasia Fossae, which are extensional features south of the Tharsis region. They can been seen very clearly in the bottom of this image, superposed by younger craters. For scale, the largest crater in this image is ~20 km (~14 miles) across.

Click on the above image to see the full CRISM scan.

The Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) is one of six science instruments on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Led by The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, the CRISM team includes expertise from universities, government agencies and small businesses in the United States and abroad.

CRISM's mission: Find the spectral fingerprints of aqueous and hydrothermal deposits and map the geology, composition and stratigraphy of surface features. The instrument also tracks seasonal variations in dust and ice aerosols in the Martian atmosphere, and water content in surface materials — leading to new understanding of the climate.

Credit: NASA/JPL/JHUAPL

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