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Chlorite and High-Calcium Pyroxene in Bosporos Rupes
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Chlorite and High-Calcium Pyroxene in Bosporos Rupes

Acquired Date: February 3, 2008
Release Date: December 27, 2013
Latitude: -42.23 N
Longitude: -53.08 E
Keywords: Crater Interior/Rim/Ejecta, Volcanic Feature, Hydrated Mineral, Mafic minerals, Phyllosilicate minerals, Southern Highlands, Tharsis Region
Parameters: D2300 (Fe-Mg phyllosilicates), HCPINDEX2 (High-Calcium Pyroxene), OLINDEX3 (Olivine)

Atop this peak in Bosporos Rupes, we see chlorite (yellow), olivine (red), and high-calcium pyroxene (HCP; blue). Chlorite belongs to the family of clay-like minerals called phyllosilicates, and forms by the alteration of pyroxenes. HCP is a dominant silicate mineral in most martian igneous rocks and contains iron, magnesium, and high amounts of calcium in addition to silicon and oxygen. Olivine is an iron-magnesium silicate. Olivine and pyroxene are primary minerals in Mars’ predominantly igneous crust, and chlorite occurs locally where the crust has been chemically altered by water.



Atop this peak in Bosporos Rupes, we see chlorite (yellow), olivine (red), and high-calcium pyroxene (HCP; blue). Chlorite belongs to the family of clay-like minerals called phyllosilicates, and forms by the alteration of pyroxenes. HCP is a dominant silicate mineral in most martian igneous rocks and contains iron, magnesium, and high amounts of calcium in addition to silicon and oxygen. Olivine is an iron-magnesium silicate. Olivine and pyroxene are primary minerals in Mars’ predominantly igneous crust, and chlorite occurs locally where the crust has been chemically altered by water.

Bosporus Rupes is part of a series of mountains that rim the gigantic Argyre impact basin, one of the youngest well-preserved impact basins on Mars. Formation of the basin exposed a variety of igneous rocks, as well as rocks like the chlorite-containing material here that were probably formed at depth by heated water. The craters’ scarring Mars’ face also act as nature’s probes into the composition and processes in the subsurface.

Links to further description of the spectral parameters shown in this image.

Disclaimer: Colors shown here represent indicators of mineralogy and are not what the human eye would see.

Acknowledgements: THEMIS, MOLA, CRISM, Google Earth.

The Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) is one of six science instruments on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Led by The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, the CRISM team includes expertise from universities, government agencies and small businesses in the United States and abroad.

CRISM's mission: Find the spectral fingerprints of aqueous and hydrothermal deposits and map the geology, composition and stratigraphy of surface features. The instrument also tracks seasonal variations in dust and ice aerosols in the Martian atmosphere, and water content in surface materials — leading to new understanding of the climate.

Credit: NASA/JPL/JHUAPL

   

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